AI Counters Hacking

Original article was published on Becoming Human: Artificial Intelligence Magazine

Source

AI in Hacking

Over the past few years, we have seen that the amount of user data is being compromised. As the Internet of Things (IoT) and widespread Internet usage have caught on, cybercrime has grown rapidly. This not only compromises consumers but also damages the reputation of companies.

When these violations occur, the financial risks are unstable. Here’s how Artificial Intelligence (AI) is used to solve cybercrime.

AI: Flood Gates for Cybercrime:

Artificial intelligence is one thing that has enabled cybercriminals like never before, and the Internet of Things relies heavily on it. Simply put, cybercriminals are making AI developments much easier to breach systems and steal data. As AI continues to grow rapidly, there is certainly cause for concern.

It is widely known that cybercriminals are adopting the latest technologies in fields such as AI. They do this to create attacks that are more powerful, less noticeable, and have far-reaching effects. Also, with the huge expansion in cloud computing, the entire cybersecurity environment is more complex than ever before.

As AI SERVICES capabilities become more powerful, it is natural to use AI systems to create new threats and assist existing ones. Also, the ever-increasing impact of AI on the physical world think drones and automobiles may, in theory, lead to very frightening results.

Cybersecurity talent shortage:

This could not have come at a worse time: there is a huge talent gap in the cybersecurity industry. This is nothing short of a crisis. As hackers and cybercriminals accelerate their efforts using sophisticated technologies and tools, cybersecurity professionals need as much help as they can get their hands on. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are well aware and take advantage of this vulnerability.

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Companies that are less expensive and employ less can do little to prevent attacks or respond decisively when they occur. This shortage of cybersecurity skills means that the demand is astronomical, the prices are high and there are many barriers to access to cybersecurity professionals. These are difficult to overcome, especially for smaller companies.

With the utility of web and cloud products and services currently dominating the market, it is very difficult for businesses to find the right talent for their IT needs. This is a very often targeted startup and small business and the results can sometimes be fatal.

All of this can happen, but large corporations can easily tap into cybersecurity expertise. Something needs to change, but what?

IBM study, what is alarming is that over 90% of cybercrime comes from defects on our behalf and on behalf of end-users.

While there are many sophisticated cybersecurity solutions available today, including those that use AI, most major breaches target the human errors that are rooted in our behavior, not just the vulnerabilities and vulnerabilities found in networks and systems. By becoming self-aware and recognizing this behavior, users like you and I can protect ourselves from cybercrime. It requires very little effort. It is widely acknowledged that many human behaviors help cybercriminals, but there are three more than others:

1. Default bias:

Accept and double the default security settings on computers And not using the full advantage of two-factor authentication does not only give IT departments a headache, but they can also endanger data.

2. Conditioning:

We are conditioned to stay tuned and complacent about the latest threats, vulnerable to significant minor cybersecurity issues such as phishing, and many security warnings and warnings.

3. Fear of Hype and False:

Every time a high-profile attack or problem hits the news. It asks security professionals to work round-the-clock to fix it. Organizations also follow suit and try to protect themselves without ever having to worry. All the while, they ignore the current vulnerability.

Cybersecurity professionals are looking at Artificial Intelligence (AI) with excitement and trepidation. On the one hand, it has the potential to add completely new layers of security for critical data and infrastructure, but on the other hand, it can also be used as a powerful weapon to prevent those defenses from leaving a trace.

AI hacking:

Researchers are already showing how neural networks can be fooled into thinking that the image of a turtle is actually a rifle’s image, and how a simple sticker on a stop sign causes an autonomous car to drive straight into an intersection. This kind of manipulation is not only possible after AI is deployed, but it also gives hackers the ability to destroy all sorts of vulnerabilities without hitting the client enterprise’s infrastructure while training itself.

The IT security industry is bracing itself for new wave hacking exploits powered by smart technology, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Black Hot Computer professionals are expected to unleash a number of unethical tactics to target and manipulate individuals and organizations that are not fundamental to dealing with it.

Jobs in AI

The age of artificial intelligence is now underway, and the use of the power of AI is one of the key agenda issues in many business organizations worldwide. It is common to use machine learning to control business data and understand business trends.

Hackers are searching for this technology to create AI-powered malware that can detect malicious applications in a benign data payload. AI techniques can hide the conditions necessary to unlock malicious payload, making it nearly impossible to reverse-engineer a threat, bypassing advanced anti-virus and malware intrusion detection systems.

Potential for machine learning:

Many companies are now looking at leveraging AI against AI in the fight against cybercrime. At the moment, it is very clear that we are in the midst of an arms race against cybercriminals.

Cybercriminals may be winning now, but as cybersecurity professionals and new startups begin to focus on improving their AI algorithms and addressing this prevalent problem, it’s not clear how long they can go unchecked.

An exciting evolution is taking inspiration from the human body. For millions of years, our immune system has learned to understand itself. A big part of this is the way it can detect threats and fight back faster, even if our bodies have never seen them before.

This is the basic way to describe our immunity and the same can be applied to AI.

Under the influence of machine learning and cybersecurity solutions, the computer’s immune system can use algorithms to detect when digital threats occur, long before a breach occurs, and to prevent this. By connecting to the company’s network, AI can learn about it.

Over time, machine learning determines what is normal and struggles with anything that seems normal.

AI is great for developing cybercrime, but the best way to do it is with us. Although the threats from AI-assisted cybercrime are scary, according to a 2014 IBM study, what is alarming is that over 90% of cybercrime comes from defects on our behalf and on behalf of end-users.

While there are many sophisticated cybersecurity solutions available today, including those that use AI, most major breaches target the human errors that are rooted in our behavior, not just the vulnerabilities and vulnerabilities found in networks and systems. By becoming self-aware and recognizing this behavior, users like you and I can protect ourselves from cybercrime. It requires very little effort. It is widely acknowledged that many human behaviors help cybercriminals, but there are three more than others:

1. Default bias:

Accept and double the default security settings on computers And not using the full advantage of two-factor authentication does not only give IT departments a headache, but they can also endanger data.

2. Conditioning:

We are conditioned to stay tuned and complacent about the latest threats, vulnerable to significant minor cybersecurity issues such as phishing, and many security warnings and warnings.

3. Fear of Hype and False:

Every time a high-profile attack or problem hits the news. It asks security professionals to work round-the-clock to fix it. Organizations also follow suit and try to protect themselves without ever having to worry. All the while, they ignore the current vulnerability.

So, what is the technology or good human behavior of using AI to fight cybercrime that uses AI? While the former is much more likely to happen than the latter, it is a combination of the two that would be the most effective solution.

Closing Points:

Yes, there is much we can do to fight cybercrime more carefully and self-aware. However, there is still a huge shortage of skills and cybercrime is becoming smarter, more brazen, and harder to detect. It is a combination of AI and human intelligence, which is very promising in the war against cybercriminals.

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AI Counters Hacking was originally published in Becoming Human: Artificial Intelligence Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.