Is AI ready to fly solo in your data center?

Original article can be found here (source): Artificial Intelligence on Medium

Is AI ready to fly solo in your data center?

Hands-off operation is not a new concept in data centers by any stretch. The term “Lights out operation” has been around for more than a decade, and most data centers are operated by just a handful of people whose main job is to fix broken hardware. But with the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning in recent years, server vendors have taken automation to a whole new level, using AI to do mundane or repetitive tasks and thus free up the humans to do more important work. So is AI ready for prime time? Some think so. Anthony DeLima, head of digital transformation and U.S. operations for Neoris, a digital transformation accelerator, said AI is good for repetitive activities that are being automated. “Intelligent process automation has been around for years but has gotten to a level where you should let automated processes take over with repetitive tasks, rather than risk a higher error rate if you have a human do it,” he said. “I’m more nervous about human error,” said Craig Wilensky, CEO of JASCI Software, a SaaS platform supporting ecommerce logistics and distribution. “We’ve had instances where staff are doing things and make a mistake. Sometimes those mistakes are big. Autonomy is designed not to make mistakes. I think these smart systems are just at the beginning and it’s just going to get better.” Jake Ring, CEO of data center provider GIGA Data Centers, said the hyperconverged infrastructure market has taken a lead in autonomy, which is why that market has seen such dramatic growth. HCI was supposed to be 35 percent of converged market by 2019, but by 2018 it was 46 percent. “The ease of use and automation behind it means a generalist can do the job without requiring an expert,” he said. “You can take repetitive things people are doing and reallocate resources to something else. We have a human resource shortage in our industry, so the more we can free them up and apply them to customer and other initiatives, the better.” No one is pushing this harder than Oracle. OpenWorld in 2018 was all about Hands-off operation is not a new concept in data centers by any stretch. The term “Lights out operation” has been around for more than a decade, and most data centers are operated by just a handful of people whose main job is to fix broken hardware. But with the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning in recent years, server vendors have taken automation to a whole new level, using AI to do mundane or repetitive tasks and thus free up the humans to do more important work. So is AI ready for prime time? Some think so. Anthony DeLima, head of digital transformation and U.S. operations for Neoris, a digital transformation accelerator, said AI is good for repetitive activities that are being automated. “Intelligent process automation has been around for years but has gotten to a level where you should let automated processes take over with repetitive tasks, rather than risk a higher error rate if you have a human do it,” he said. “I’m more nervous about human error,” said Craig Wilensky, CEO of JASCI Software, a SaaS platform supporting ecommerce logistics and distribution. “We’ve had instances where staff are doing things and make a mistake. Sometimes those mistakes are big. Autonomy is designed not to make mistakes. I think these smart systems are just at the beginning and it’s just going to get better.” Jake Ring, CEO of data center provider GIGA Data Centers, said the hyperconverged infrastructure market has taken a lead in autonomy, which is why that market has seen such dramatic growth. HCI was supposed to be 35 percent of converged market by 2019, but by 2018 it was 46 percent. “The ease of use and automation behind it means a generalist can do the job without requiring an expert,” he said. “You can take repetitive things people are doing and reallocate resources to something else.

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